Recently, Yahoo launched a beta version of a service called Media RSS that lets anyone with footage submit videos for distribution. Bradley Horowitz, director of multimedia and desktop search at Yahoo, said the feature is designed to provide an easy way for “mom and pop creators of video” to connect with people who might be interested in viewing their content. The RSS feature follows the December launch of a video search engine.

This year, Yahoo is projecting that the number of videos streamed over the web will grow by nearly 50 percent from last year. Citing forecasts it commissioned from AccuStream iMedia Research, Yahoo said net users are expected to stream more than 21 billion videos in 2005, up from 14.2 billion last year.

Yahoo’s video-related rollouts come as the company’s arch rival, Google, is expanding in the video search arena. Google is currently running a beta version of an upload program that lets anyone submit videos electronically to its Google Video site, so long as they own the rights to the work. The company said the videos will be made available on its video search site, but has not specified a date.

http://www.wired.com/news/digiwood/0,1412,67302,00.html?tw=rss.TOP
nice roundup of what is currently happening on the video distribution market. i think things will slightly change in future and we can expect alternative or amateur video content as a seperate format next to tv and video on demand.